Option Routes and why Jacksonville may struggle with them – Football 101

option routes

Option routes

On a play, one WR/TE/RB may be given the “option” of running two or three different pre-determined routes. It’s the WR’s call based on the coverage. He can decide at the line of scrimmage, or sometime during the play.

Not only must he need to read the defense, but must be an excellent route runner with good quickness to turn on a dime when he changes his mind if the defense bites, or leaves a spot open.

As of right now, experienced depth and chemistry with Blake Bortles is a little thin. On the tight end side, things don’t look much better. All those drops week 1 aren’t inspiring.

*to note: this is football 101, things are simply explained and usually/typically can be inserted into most sentences.

I stressed experience because it matters in reading defenses, plus it also relies heavily on the quarterback, too.

While there are dozens of various routes that can be run, only three options max are decided upon because a) the quarterback has to be aware enough of which routes he could run, while watching his other receivers plus the defense and b) only so many are realistic.

FYI, not many TE’s are given the option because their route running isn’t good enough, nor is their “sell”. However, when you have the best like Rob Gronkowski (Jason Whitten was better), they can torch defenses.

When the receiver and QB are on the same page, they’re extremely dangerous to defenses unless you have DB’s who can cover really well. This teamwork builds over time, the duo reading each other’s minds almost. The best way to pull these off is to have more than two players who can effectively run them.

Also need is a QB who is experienced enough to go through his progressions. Right now, our corps is iffy and the jury is out on how well Bortles handles the option with this raw group.

In the NFL, WR’s aren’t just trying to get open, the option can also be used to trick defenses to think the ball is going one way. Call it a dummy option. The stem route is crucial.

Below are the very basic routes. On an option, they could have the choice of a comeback, curl or a fade because his coverage is blown. Or maybe, at the LOS the WR starts out thinking slant, but turns it into a go. He could fake a flat, but instead turn back and run a fade or out. There are dozens and dozens of route combos based off this tree, but it gives you an idea.

Bad things happen when the QB/WR/TE aren’t on the same page. If the WR choses a comeback, but the QB doesn’t see it or lacks the arm for the throw, if you’re lucky, it’s only an incomplete. Some veteran WR’s know what skills their QB’s are better/worse at and even though a tougher route could give bigger gains, chooses the easier one.

A five yard gain beats an interception on a deep comeback. An inexperienced receiver or even a more seasoned TE, might not have enough knowledge to know, so they choose the glory play over what their QB excels at.

This is why Jax may keep options to a minimum, at least for 1/2 the season. With questions at the WR position, there may not be enough time to get that chemistry going. While the onus is on the receiver to pick the right option because of his skill at reading the defense (and beating coverage), the QB’s savvy can’t be overlooked.

Learn about Stem Routes and why running them well helps the quarterback: Football 101

Over the last two seasons, we’ve seen inconsistent quarterbacking, but the receivers (and tight ends) weren’t consistently performing at their top-level. Plus, the depth behind them was poor. A very good QB can overcome, but weak play from receivers only compounds poor quarterbacking.

Why bring this up with Stem Routes? Because the Stem of a route begins the moment the wide receiver (or TE) pushes off. The black line below is the stem. As mentioned in the option route piece, WRs need to sell every route as looking the same. Running a Stem sounds simple: run until you turn (make break). It’s not.

*to note: this is Football 101, simple is used. Many sentences can use the words, usually or typically.

At the LOS, most plays will have a CB line up against them, either in soft press, hard press or off man (seven or so yards back from the LOS). That CB wants to mirror his guy, read his hips and respond. A good WR is able to keep his hips pointing one direction, sink them, plant his outside (or inside foot), and turn on a dime before the CB can react.

This creates separation.
It’s important to know that while the Stem starts at the line of scrimmage, mentally it begins much sooner: in the film room. Receivers need to know the CB’s who will be covering them. If he is an aggressive guy who likes to play hard press, then that first push at the LOS could be a step back. Why?

As covered in hard press, the CB wants to jam his guy, disrupt his timing so the route is shot. When the ball is snapped, the good WR takes a step back and lets his CB come at him, then pushes him aside and bam, he gone.

Remember in press, the hips don’t lie? The stem is all about the hips. If a receiver can get his hips inside, he’s open. That’s the size of an NFL window—the width of a pair of hips.

The dance between the WR and CB is all about who can get their hips to lie, read their opponents (and QB) and get the other to bite.

Rookie receivers tend to struggle with that part. They can run a route, catch the ball, but the ability to do what Diggs does in the below play, is tough to come by. Selling the stem and making the cut against the #1 CB.

Have a QB who can’t throw a rocket or on a dime, but still manages to make good plays? He has receivers who help him by creating space they can maneuver in. If the ball is a tad slow or off by a foot because there is separation, it lessens the chance of an interception. It also allows the receiver to adjust to the ball since there’s no defender draped over him.

Seasoned CB’s know which QBs struggle and they will try to jump a route, this makes selling the stem that more important. Get the CB to bite on a dig, but run a post, etc.

The below gif was against Aqib Talib in 2015 (who was tops), Stephon Diggs was a rookie in his first game against the top corner that season. Diggs keeps his head straight, his hips straight, plants his leg wide as if he’s going to go inside and instead runs an out route. Gets Talib to turn his hips out. Perfection.

Good Stem Routes should create separation.

My guess is Talib got over-confident. Didn’t expect this from some 21-year-old kid, so he got burned. That step sold it, look at all that space. The crappiest of crappy QBs can look like heroes if their WRs can give that barn door-sized window.

Jacksonville needs their young receiving corps of Marqise Lee, Keelan Cole, Dede Westbrook and rookie DJ Chark to play at Diggs’ level who’s even better now. One step is all it takes to help or hurt Bortles.

Another trick WR’s can do on their Stems is a double (or triple) move. They can be used at any depth; it’s all about where the WR thinks he can shed his coverage. When he can get leverage off the hips, get the CB’s pointing away from where the route should end, he’s won. Even though he’s making more than one cut, it’s still the same stem because the route is about where the ball should be caught.

In summation, the stem is to trick the corner into going one way, while he goes another and to do that, he needs agility, speed, knowledge and a connection with his quarterback. Here’s to hoping our receiving corp can deliver.